Mafaldine from Naples

Many Italian pasta shapes have a history and mafaldine is one of them. It is long, flat and 1/2 inch wide, similar to tagliatelle but with ruffled sides.

It seems that this tasty and substantial pasta was made by the Neapolitan people to welcome and ingratiate themselves with King Manfredi of Savoia and his family. The King of Sicily arrived in the city with his court and reigned from 1258 to 1266. The pasta was so appreciated by the King, that since then it has also become one of the symbolic recipes of the Carnevale. It is also a traditional Sunday pasta.

Mafaldine is also known as ‘reginette’, meaning ‘little queen’ and refers to Princess Mafalda of Savoy. In the northwest region of Liguria, ‘reginette’ can also refer to linguine or tagliolini.

Mafaldine pasta is made using only semolina flour and water and is the perfect backdrop to many robust sauces. The most popular sauces served include sausage, ricotta, tomato and many different types of winter vegetables such as artichoke.

mafaldine reginette pasta

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